Cristin-resultat-ID: 1132236
Sist endret: 27. september 2018, 13:24
NVI-rapporteringsår: 2014
Resultat
Vitenskapelig artikkel
2014

All Part of the Job? The contribution of the Psychosocial and Physical Work Environment to Health Inequalities in Europe and the European Health Divide

Bidragsytere:
  • Marlen Toch-Marquardt
  • Clare Bambra
  • Thorsten Lunau
  • Kjetil A. van Der Wel
  • Margot I. Witvliet
  • Nico Dragano
  • mfl.

Tidsskrift

International Journal of Health Services
ISSN 0020-7314
e-ISSN 1541-4469
NVI-nivå 1

Om resultatet

Vitenskapelig artikkel
Publiseringsår: 2014
Volum: 44
Hefte: 2
Sider: 285 - 305
Open Access

Importkilder

Scopus-ID: 2-s2.0-84899554504

Klassifisering

Vitenskapsdisipliner

Samfunnsvitenskap

Emneord

Sosialepidemiologi

Beskrivelse Beskrivelse

Tittel

All Part of the Job? The contribution of the Psychosocial and Physical Work Environment to Health Inequalities in Europe and the European Health Divide

Sammendrag

This study is the first to examine the contribution of both psychosocial and physical risk factors to occupational inequalities in self-assessed health in Europe. Data from 27 countries were obtained from the 2010 European Working Conditions Survey for men and women aged 16 to 60 (n = 21,803). Multilevel logistic regression analyses (random intercept) were applied, estimating odds ratios of reporting less than good health. Analyses indicate that physical working conditions account for a substantial proportion of occupational inequalities in health in both Central/Eastern and Western Europe. Physical, rather than psychosocial, working conditions seem to have the largest effect on self-assessed health in manual classes. For example, controlling for physical working conditions reduced the inequalities in the prevalence of "less than good health" between the lowest (semi- and unskilled manual workers) and highest (higher controllers) occupational groups in Europe by almost 50 percent (Odds Ratio 1.87, 95% Confidence Interval 1.62-2.16 to 1.42, 1.23-1.65). Physical working conditions contribute substantially to health inequalities across "post-industrial" Europe, with women in manual occupations being particularly vulnerable, especially those living in Central/Eastern Europe. An increased political and academic focus on physical working conditions is needed to explain and potentially reduce occupational inequalities in health.

Bidragsytere

Marlen Toch-Marquardt

  • Tilknyttet:
    Forfatter
    ved Institutt for sosiologi og statsvitenskap ved Norges teknisk-naturvitenskapelige universitet

Clare Bambra

  • Tilknyttet:
    Forfatter
    ved University of Durham

Thorsten Lunau

  • Tilknyttet:
    Forfatter
    ved Heinrich-Heine-Universität Düsseldorf
Aktiv cristin-person

Kjetil A. van der Wel

Bidragsyterens navn vises på dette resultatet som Kjetil A. van Der Wel
  • Tilknyttet:
    Forfatter
    ved Institutt for sosialfag ved OsloMet - storbyuniversitetet

Margot I. Witvliet

  • Tilknyttet:
    Forfatter
    ved Institutt for sosiologi og statsvitenskap ved Norges teknisk-naturvitenskapelige universitet
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