Cristin-resultat-ID: 1314106
Sist endret: 15. januar 2016 11:46
Resultat
Poster
2015

Despite having my teacher’s voice I really believed the avatar was a patient

Bidragsytere:
  • Camilla Foss og
  • Anne Gerd Granås

Presentasjon

Navn på arrangementet: ESCP–SFPC international workshop acquisition of pharmaceutical skills: simulation, serious games, innovative approaches
Sted: Nice
Dato fra: 22. juni 2015
Dato til: 23. juni 2015

Arrangør:

Arrangørnavn: European Society of Clinical Pharmacy

Om resultatet

Poster
Publiseringsår: 2015

Beskrivelse Beskrivelse

Tittel

Despite having my teacher’s voice I really believed the avatar was a patient

Sammendrag

Despite having my teacher’s voice I really believed the avatar was a patient C. Foss1,*, A. G. Granas1 1Faculty of Health Sciences, Oslo and Akershus University College of Applied Sciences, Oslo, Norway Background and objective: Many pharmacy students are afraid to expose incompetence in role-plays, in particular if their counter partner is a lecturer, due to the obvious hierarchal difference. If both student and lecturer take on avatar roles, it may be easier for the ‘‘avatar-pharmacist’’ (student) and the ‘‘avatar-patient’’ (lecturer) to communicate as equals. The aim of this study was to explore if virtual role-play diminish some hierarchical barriers compared to classical role-plays. Setting and method: Swedish pharmacy students had played pharmacist- avatars against their lecturer playing patient-avatars. An interview guide about strengths and limitations of virtual role-play was developed. We taped four Skype interviews (30–45 min) with students, and analysed the answers. In addition we visually observed one of the role-plays in the virtual world. Main outcome measures: Strengths and limitations of virtual roleplays. Results: The students said that they ‘‘felt that the setting was as a real pharmacy’’ and that they ‘‘accepted their avatar-roles as a true pharmacist’’, despite that the patient-avatar had the lecturer’s voice. The students said it was easier to actually hear and interpret what the avatar-patient said in a rather simple simulated pharmacy compared to traditional role-plays with other students present. The explanation was that there were fewer impressions to focus on in the virtual room. Shortcomings with a patient-avatar is lack of body language. Students missed the ability to observe patients feelings such as uncertainty or anxiety. Students felt virtual role-plays had highlighted their need to strengthen their skills in observing patients’ body language in a normal pharmacy. Conclusion: Virtual role-play reduced some of the hierarchical barriers between students and lecturer. However, students felt that the lack of body language in the patient-avatar limited their ability to interpret if patients understood their communication about medicines. A virtual world can, with today’s technology, only partly replace traditional role-plays and/or training in the real pharmacy settings. Disclosure of interest: None declared.

Bidragsytere

Camilla Foss

  • Tilknyttet:
    Forfatter
    ved Institutt for naturvitenskapelige helsefag ved OsloMet - storbyuniversitetet

Anne Gerd Granås

  • Tilknyttet:
    Forfatter
    ved Institutt for naturvitenskapelige helsefag ved OsloMet - storbyuniversitetet
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