Cristin-resultat-ID: 1839849
Sist endret: 19. februar 2021 12:53
NVI-rapporteringsår: 2020
Resultat
Vitenskapelig artikkel
2020

Do Childhood Boarding School Experiences Predict Health, Well-Being and Disability Pension in Adults? A SAMINOR Study

Bidragsytere:
  • Oddgeir Friborg
  • Tore Sørlie
  • Berit Schei
  • Anne Cecilie Javo
  • Øystein Sørbye og
  • Ketil Lenert Hansen

Tidsskrift

Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology
ISSN 0022-0221
e-ISSN 1552-5422
NVI-nivå 1

Om resultatet

Vitenskapelig artikkel
Publiseringsår: 2020
Publisert online: 2020
Trykket: 2020
Volum: 51
Hefte: 10
Sider: 848 - 875
Open Access

Importkilder

Scopus-ID: 2-s2.0-85092558468

Beskrivelse Beskrivelse

Tittel

Do Childhood Boarding School Experiences Predict Health, Well-Being and Disability Pension in Adults? A SAMINOR Study

Sammendrag

Indigenous Sámi and Kven minority children in Norway were during the 20th century placed at boarding schools to hasten their adoption of the Norwegian majority language and culture. This is the first population-based study examining health, well-being and disability pension rates among these children. Data stem from two epidemiological studies conducted in 2003/04 (SAMINOR 1) and 2012 (SAMINOR 2) by the Centre for Sami Health Research. The SAMINOR 1 study included N=13,974 residents (50.1% women, Mage=52.9 years) and n=2,125 boarding participants (49.6% women, Mage=56.2 years). The SAMINOR 2 part included N=10,512 residents (55.5% women, Mage=47.6 years) and n=1246 boarding participants (48.7% women, Mage=54.1 years). Main outcome measures are mental and general health, well-being and disability pension linearly regressed upon the predictors. We observed minor differences between boarding and non-boarding participants that generally disfavored the former, of which many disappeared after covariate adjustment. Boarding school participants reported more discrimination, violence, unhealthier lifestyle behavior (smoking), less education and household income compared to non-boarding participants. The exceptionally long timeframe between boarding school and the current outcome measures (40-50 years) is a likely reason for the weak associations. The study supports the international literature on health inequalities and highlights the risk of ill health following boarding school placement of indigenous or minority children. On a positive note, participants reporting stronger ethnic belonging (strong Sámi identity) were well protected, and even functioned better in terms of lower disability rates than majority Norwegians.

Bidragsytere

Oddgeir Friborg

  • Tilknyttet:
    Forfatter
    ved Forskningsgruppe for helsepsykologi ved UiT Norges arktiske universitet

Tore Sørlie

  • Tilknyttet:
    Forfatter
    ved Psykisk helse- og rusklinikk ved Universitetssykehuset Nord-Norge HF
  • Tilknyttet:
    Forfatter
    ved Psykiatri ved UiT Norges arktiske universitet

Berit Schei

  • Tilknyttet:
    Forfatter
    ved Kvinneklinikken ved St. Olavs Hospital HF
  • Tilknyttet:
    Forfatter
    ved Institutt for samfunnsmedisin og sykepleie ved Norges teknisk-naturvitenskapelige universitet

Anne Cecilie Javo

  • Tilknyttet:
    Forfatter
    ved Finnmarkssykehuset

Øystein Sørbye

  • Tilknyttet:
    Forfatter
    ved Finnmarkssykehuset
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