Cristin-resultat-ID: 1968932
Sist endret: 3. april 2022, 14:19
Resultat
Vitenskapelig foredrag
2022

Panel: Time, narrative and technology in English classrooms in Norway

Bidragsytere:
  • Astrid Elisabeth Kure
  • Shilan Ahmadian og
  • Lisbeth M. Brevik

Presentasjon

Navn på arrangementet: NEAS2022
Sted: Stockholm
Dato fra: 11. mai 2022
Dato til: 13. mai 2022

Arrangør:

Arrangørnavn: Nordic Association of English Studies Triennial Conference

Om resultatet

Vitenskapelig foredrag
Publiseringsår: 2022

Beskrivelse Beskrivelse

Tittel

Panel: Time, narrative and technology in English classrooms in Norway

Sammendrag

In this panel, we will present two studies from nine English classrooms in Norway across 8th, 9th and 10th grade, where teenagers are video recorded over time concerning their use of narratives and technology. Gee (2007) states that using technology is valuable for narrative engagement, which in turn leads to learning. The present study argues that engagement in narratives and technology has the potential to develop skills critical for education. Digital technologies are considered a crucial aspect of educational policy around the world (Erstad et al., 2021; Ferrari, 2013; Kaarakainen & Saikkonen, 2021). Information and communication technology can complement, enrich and transform education for the better (UNESCO, 2021). The first study addresses how time matters when teenagers engage in two very different narratives by reading a novel and playing an online game to learn about Native Americans. The study draws on video recordings from 30 English lessons in two lower secondary classrooms in Norway, following 60 students during a two-week gaming-based project in 8th grade. Findings showed that time matter. A notable finding is that the combination of reading fiction and playing a video game matter in terms of student engagement, which aligns with research by the UK's National Literacy Trust (2020). One class read the novel before playing the game, while the other class played the game before reading the novel. The students who read the novel before playing the game were more engaged and learnt more about native Americans compared to the students who played the video game before reading the novel. The second study investigates teenagers' use of English across technologies and time. Adapting a national Framework for Digital Skills into an observation protocol (Norwegian Directorate of Education and Training, 2012), this study analysed video recordings from 60 English lessons in seven lower secondary classrooms in Norway, following 186 students across two school years (9th and 10th grade). The results show that students used digital skills critical for education in half of the video-recorded lessons. The main differences within and across classrooms related to the type of digital skills used in any given lesson, and an increase in the use of digital skills over time. First, students’ used basic rather than advanced digital skills. Second, when using digital skills, the main repertoire involved searching for and processing information online, and using digital technology to produce written texts. Third, we identified that the students’ use of digital skills increased over time. In the panel, we will present illustrative examples of how time matters when students engage with digital skills, narratives and online games in English. Implications for practice and the direction of future research are discussed.

Bidragsytere

Astrid Elisabeth Kure

  • Tilknyttet:
    Forfatter
    ved Institutt for språk, litteratur og kultur ved Høgskolen i Østfold

Shilan Ahmadian

  • Tilknyttet:
    Forfatter
    ved Institutt for lærerutdanning ved Universitetet i Oslo
Aktiv cristin-person

Lisbeth M. Brevik

  • Tilknyttet:
    Forfatter
    ved Institutt for lærerutdanning ved Universitetet i Oslo
1 - 3 av 3