Cristin-resultat-ID: 2025977
Sist endret: 2. juni 2022, 10:31
NVI-rapporteringsår: 2022
Resultat
Vitenskapelig artikkel
2022

Sleep in adolescence: Considering family structure and family complexity

Bidragsytere:
  • Sondre Aasen Nilsen
  • Malin Bergström
  • Børge Sivertsen
  • Kjell Morten Stormark og
  • Mari Hysing

Tidsskrift

Journal of Marriage and Family
ISSN 0022-2445
e-ISSN 1741-3737
NVI-nivå 2

Om resultatet

Vitenskapelig artikkel
Publiseringsår: 2022
Publisert online: 2022
Open Access

Beskrivelse Beskrivelse

Tittel

Sleep in adolescence: Considering family structure and family complexity

Sammendrag

Objectives To investigate associations between family structure, family complexity, and sleep in adolescence. Background Family structure may be associated with sleep patterns and sleep problems among adolescents. Yet, research documenting this association has not captured the complexity of modern families and used crude measures of sleep. Method The youth@hordaland study (N = 8833) of adolescents aged 16–19 conducted in 2012 in Norway provided a detailed assessment of family structure, family complexity (i.e., living with half-/stepsiblings), and multiple sleep parameters. Insomnia and delayed sleep–wake phase disorder (DSWPD) were defined in alignment with diagnostic criteria. Ordinary least squares and Poisson regression analyses were used to assess associations between family structure, family complexity, and sleep outcomes. Results Adolescents in joint physical custody (JPC) had more similar sleep parameters as peers in nuclear families than in single-and stepparent families. Adolescents in single- and stepparent families had a higher risk of short sleep duration on weekdays, long sleep onset latency, long wake after sleep onset, oversleeping, insomnia, and DSWPD than peers in nuclear families. Family complexity was also associated with a higher risk of sleep problems, but the risk attenuated when considered jointly with family structure. Socioeconomic status and depressive symptoms partly attenuated the differences between the groups. Conclusion Inequalities in sleep exist by family structure and, in part, family complexity. Despite alternating between two homes and often experiencing family complexity, sleep among adolescents in JPC was more similar to peers in nuclear families than in single- and stepparent families.

Bidragsytere

Sondre Aasen Nilsen

  • Tilknyttet:
    Forfatter
    ved NORCE Helse og samfunn - RKBU ved NORCE Norwegian Research Centre AS

Malin Bergström

  • Tilknyttet:
    Forfatter
    ved Centre for Health Equity Studies
  • Tilknyttet:
    Forfatter
    ved Karolinska Institutet
Aktiv cristin-person

Børge Sivertsen

  • Tilknyttet:
    Forfatter
    ved Forsknings- og innovasjonsavdelingen ved Helse Fonna HF
  • Tilknyttet:
    Forfatter
    ved Institutt for psykisk helse ved Norges teknisk-naturvitenskapelige universitet
  • Tilknyttet:
    Forfatter
    ved Avdeling for helsefremmende arbeid ved Folkehelseinstituttet

Kjell Morten Stormark

  • Tilknyttet:
    Forfatter
    ved NORCE Helse og samfunn - RKBU ved NORCE Norwegian Research Centre AS
  • Tilknyttet:
    Forfatter
    ved Institutt for helse, miljø og likeverd ved Universitetet i Bergen

Mari Hysing

  • Tilknyttet:
    Forfatter
    ved NORCE Helse og samfunn - RKBU ved NORCE Norwegian Research Centre AS
  • Tilknyttet:
    Forfatter
    ved Institutt for samfunnspsykologi ved Universitetet i Bergen
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