Cristin-resultat-ID: 732971
Sist endret: 21. januar 2015 15:27
Resultat
Annet produkt
2010

Sixty Headless Skeletons -- 3,000 Years Old -- Discovered in Pacific Ocean Archipelag When a team of archaeologists began excavating an old coral reef in Vanuatu in 2008 and 2009, they soon discovered it had served as a cemetery in ancient times. So far, 71 buried individuals have been recorded, giving new information on the islands' inhabitants and their funeral rites

Bidragsytere:
  • Mads Ravn

Utgiver

UKJENT

Om resultatet

Annet produkt
Publiseringsår: 2010

Importkilder

ForskDok-ID: r10022339

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Emneord

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Tittel

Sixty Headless Skeletons -- 3,000 Years Old -- Discovered in Pacific Ocean Archipelag When a team of archaeologists began excavating an old coral reef in Vanuatu in 2008 and 2009, they soon discovered it had served as a cemetery in ancient times. So far, 71 buried individuals have been recorded, giving new information on the islands' inhabitants and their funeral rites

Sammendrag

The Vanuatu discovery of 60 headless skeletons and more with broken bones were found in a coral reef. The skeletons dated back to 3,000 year ago. Archaeologists discovered the headless skeletons while excavating an ancient coral reef which proved to have been a burial site on Vanuatu. The Pacific Ocean archipelago of Vanuatu is made up of 83 islands which lie 1750 kilometres east of Australia. The soil on Vanuatu tells of a violent eruption of a volcano 3000 years ago and there is no evidence of habitation prior to that time. "This is a groundbreaking discovery, as it is the oldest and biggest skeleton find ever in the Pacific Ocean; bigger cemeteries found further east are much younger," says Mads Ravn, head of research at the University of Stavanger's Museum of Archaeology in Norway

Bidragsytere

Mads Ravn

  • Tilknyttet:
    Eier
    ved Arkeologisk museum ved Universitetet i Stavanger
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