Cristin-resultat-ID: 885088
Sist endret: 21. januar 2015, 16:10
Resultat
Vitenskapelig foredrag
2011

Bonny GIM and Jazz GIM: What|s the diff? A comparative study of transcriptions based on five selected BMGIM programs

Bidragsytere:
  • Hallgjerd Aksnes
  • Svein E Fuglestad og
  • Ingvild Koksvik Amundsen

Presentasjon

Navn på arrangementet: Watering the Sees: Nurturing the Gift. The 21. Conference of the Association for Music and Imagery
Sted: Techny, Chicago. Illinois
Dato fra: 21. juni 2011
Dato til: 25. juni 2011

Arrangør:

Arrangørnavn: The Association for Music and Imagery

Om resultatet

Vitenskapelig foredrag
Publiseringsår: 2011

Beskrivelse Beskrivelse

Tittel

Bonny GIM and Jazz GIM: What|s the diff? A comparative study of transcriptions based on five selected BMGIM programs

Sammendrag

This paper is based on a larger study in which transcriptions from a total of 58 GIM sessions, all guided by AMI Fellow Svein Fuglestad, are analyzed and compared. In the study five different GIM programs are presented subsequently to 10 different subjects, whereas the last session is a repeated travel to one of the programs. The study is part of the 5-year research project “Music, Motion, and Emotion: Theoretical and Psychological Implications of Musical Embodiment” led by Aksnes (http://www.hf.uio.no/imv/english/research/projects/motion/index.html). The project, which is explorative and qualitative in nature, builds upon an interdisciplinary theoretical framework including music therapy research, cognitive semantics, cognitive neuroscience, infant research, and body-oriented contributions within aesthetics. The proposed paper will focus on several of the project’s main research questions: 1. Are there any consistent differences in the amount and kind of imagery evoked by the different programs? (Here we will limit the comparison to differences between the classical Bonny program Caring and the new contemplative jazz program Awakenings developed by Ian Leslie.) Regarding the amount of imagery: Do the traditional, classical orchestral/chamber music programs tend to afford richer imagery than programs offering other genres/styles of music? Regarding the kind of imagery: Does the same program offered to different listeners tend to afford similar or related imagery among the listeners, and do the programs differ in the kind of imagery they tend to afford (e.g. visual imagery, landscapes, images of bodily motion, bodily sensations, images of interpersonal relationships, emotions, colors, or transpersonal experiences)? 2. Do the listeners’ own musical taste and identity (mapped in an introductory interview) influence which programs afford the richest imagery or have the most beneficial therapeutic effect? 3. Do there appear to be idiosyncrasies in the travelers’ amount and kind of imagery, regardless of which program they are listening to? cf. Aksnes & Fuglestad, forthcoming and Aksnes & Ruud 2006, 2008 on findings of commonalities in the images reported by different GIM travelers to the same music, understood in terms of basic cognitive and emotional structures such as image-schemata (Johnson 1987, 2006), metaphorical and metonymic associations (Lakoff & Johnson 1980, 1999), and vitality affects (Stern 1985).

Bidragsytere

Aktiv cristin-person

Hallgjerd Aksnes

  • Tilknyttet:
    Forfatter
    ved Musikkvitenskap fag ved Universitetet i Oslo
Aktiv cristin-person

Svein Fuglestad

Bidragsyterens navn vises på dette resultatet som Svein E Fuglestad
  • Tilknyttet:
    Forfatter
    ved Institutt for sosialfag ved OsloMet - storbyuniversitetet
Aktiv cristin-person

Ingvild Koksvik

Bidragsyterens navn vises på dette resultatet som Ingvild Koksvik Amundsen
  • Tilknyttet:
    Forfatter
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