Cristin-prosjekt-ID: 2499253
Sist endret: 9. juni 2021 00:18

Cristin-prosjekt-ID: 2499253
Sist endret: 9. juni 2021 00:18
Prosjekt

AUTOWORK: Workers in transition through automation, digitalization and robotization of work

prosjektleder

Håkon Fyhn
ved Studio Apertura ved NTNU Samfunnsforskning AS

prosjekteier / koordinerende forskningsansvarlig enhet

  • NTNU Samfunnsforskning AS

Klassifisering

Vitenskapsdisipliner

Samfunnsvitenskap

Emneord

Helsearbeidere • Byggebransjen • Servicesektor • Automatiseringstjenester

Kategorier

Prosjektkategori

  • Anvendt forskning

Tidsramme

Aktivt
Start: 1. juli 2020 Slutt: 30. juni 2025

Beskrivelse Beskrivelse

Tittel

AUTOWORK: Workers in transition through automation, digitalization and robotization of work

Populærvitenskapelig sammendrag

This project explores worker practices and imaginaries through automation, digitalization and robotization in the Building, Healthcare and Sale & Service sectors in Norway and Australia. By cutting-edge methods and theory, it explores how increasingly advanced, complex and intelligent machines prove capable of performing work previously mastered by humans alone. Whether humans are replaced by machines, find themselves working alongside-, or working within machine systems, automation transforms working life, the role of workers, the labour market and society at large.

AUTOWORK will explore the transformation of work and trajectories
towards future work-life across three sectors that are especially prone to change because of automation. AUTOWORK will also include comparative case-studies between Norway and Australia. The goal is to generate knowledge and seek solutions to societal challenges arising from the automation, digitalization and robotization of working life in relation to welfare, adaptability, inclusion and meaning. This is done by mapping trajectories towards future work-life holding meaningful places for workers, by using an innovative method of future scenarios developed bottom-up from workers practices. Future scenarios are based on workshops with relevant stakeholders and in depth fieldwork at work-sites.
AUTOWORK focuses on four areas with particular knowledge needs in order to enhance meaningful and inclusive work-life also in the future:
(1) Deskilling, reskilling: which skills are in danger of being lost, which new skills are needed?
(2) Future everyday work practices: how can workers across sectors accommodate and trust new automated technologies?
(3) Gender: how will future work life be gendered?
(4) Worker community: how can we enhance workplace communities and organization of workers in the future?

AUTOWORK will contribute to sustainable trajectories towards future work-life by close collaboration with key stakeholders like trade unions.

Vitenskapelig sammendrag

This project explores worker practices and imaginaries through automation, digitalization and robotization in the Building, Healthcare and Sale & Service sectors in Norway and Australia. By cutting-edge methods and theory, it explores how increasingly advanced, complex and intelligent machines prove capable of performing work previously mastered by humans alone. Whether humans are replaced by machines, find themselves working alongside-, or working within machine systems, automation transforms working life, the role of workers, the labour market and society at large.

AUTOWORK will explore the transformation of work and trajectories
towards future work-life across three sectors that are especially prone to change because of automation. AUTOWORK will also include comparative case-studies between Norway and Australia. The goal is to generate knowledge and seek solutions to societal challenges arising from the automation, digitalization and robotization of working life in relation to welfare, adaptability, inclusion and meaning. This is done by mapping trajectories towards future work-life holding meaningful places for workers, by using an innovative method of future scenarios developed bottom-up from workers practices. Future scenarios are based on workshops with relevant stakeholders and in depth fieldwork at work-sites.
AUTOWORK focuses on four areas with particular knowledge needs in order to enhance meaningful and inclusive work-life also in the future:
(1) Deskilling, reskilling: which skills are in danger of being lost, which new skills are needed?
(2) Future everyday work practices: how can workers across sectors accommodate and trust new automated technologies?
(3) Gender: how will future work life be gendered?
(4) Worker community: how can we enhance workplace communities and organization of workers in the future?

AUTOWORK will contribute to sustainable trajectories towards future work-life by close collaboration with key stakeholders like trade unions.

Metode

The project uses a mixed-method design. The debate on automation is in dire need of an academically informed intervention based in theoretical scholarship and in-depth empirical research. The project will achieve this by using tailored future anthropology and design anthropology approaches to develop qualitative understandings of the future of work. These will be based on nuanced understandings of future technological possibilities, while also considering the insights of in-depth ethnographic research in the present, and workshop-based research into how existing and future work are experienced, imagined and articulated. The main methodological tools are as follows:

Design ethnography: Ethnographic studies of how the anticipatory modes of trust, hope and anxiety emerge from existing everyday working circumstances will be undertaken at each research site, involving two methods that have been tested in previous research, further developed and tailored for AUTOWORK:

1) Qualitative ethnographic work, such as observations, interviews and video recording combined with re-enactment techniques. Developed in design anthropology, these involve participants performing a task or a workplace routine. The participant will describe how this task is presently meaningful in relation to existing levels of automation and how it may be imagined/sensed in a future where automation and AI are increasingly dominant. The interviews, observations and re-enactments will involve 20 workers (a standard size for a qualitative ethnographic sample) in each country for each empirical WP (n=120 in total across all workshops) designed to represent existing gender and age distribution in each sector.

2) Design anthropological futures workshops where researchers use innovative materials based on ethnographic findings and examples of technologically possible futures. Working with participants from stakeholder groups including workers, unions, managers, and technology designers, these workshops will imagine, create and explore possible or probable automated future scenarios. The workshops will investigate how these future scenarios would be experienced and sensed, their ethics, the gender and power relationships they would entail and the regulatory frameworks they would require. There will be three workshops in both countries, with 20 stakeholders invited for each (n=120).

These methods are tailored refinements of methods that have been tested in earlier research with workers in construction, healthcare and delivery services. They innovatively use qualitative participant shadowing, collaborative re-enactments and video and sensory ethnography.

Comparative analysis: This project will create a new transferable comparative framework through which to research and analyse AUTOWORK futures, both across sectors and cross-culturally. This will enable us to develop a set of key principles, verified as applicable in different industry and national/cultural settings, for researching, analysing, understanding and proposing industry and policy-based interventions for future automated work. This will make the findings internationally significant and not merely relevant in the Norwegian and Australian context. This will be achieved by engaging and further developing a highly successful and established anthropological model for comparative analysis based on the notion of concept- metaphors. Concept-metaphors are framing devices used to compare things that are differently constituted in different research sites and cultural contexts but nevertheless have similar meanings, thus enabling us to compare different sites in the same cultural context as well as across different national contexts.

prosjektdeltakere

prosjektleder

Håkon Fyhn

  • Tilknyttet:
    Prosjektleder
    ved Studio Apertura ved NTNU Samfunnsforskning AS

Gunhild Tøndel

  • Tilknyttet:
    Prosjektdeltaker
    ved Institutt for sosiologi og statsvitenskap ved Norges teknisk-naturvitenskapelige universitet

Roger Andre Søraa

  • Tilknyttet:
    Prosjektdeltaker
    ved Institutt for tverrfaglige kulturstudier ved Norges teknisk-naturvitenskapelige universitet

Kristoffer Nergård

  • Tilknyttet:
    Prosjektdeltaker
    ved Studio Apertura ved NTNU Samfunnsforskning AS

José Artur F. da Silva e Vale Serrano

  • Tilknyttet:
    Prosjektdeltaker
    ved Institutt for nevromedisin og bevegelsesvitenskap ved Norges teknisk-naturvitenskapelige universitet
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Resultater Resultater

Responsible and ethical robot innovation and implementation .

Søraa, Roger Andre. 2021, Robotics and Artificial Intelligence Cross-Sectoral Innovation Conference (RAIC 2021). NTNUVitenskapelig foredrag

Un robot in corsia.

Søraa, Roger Andre; Pace, Alice; Ringstad, Ole Marius. 2021, NTNUIntervju

Digitalization, diversity and sustainability – Circular considerations .

Søraa, Roger Andre; Cheng, Yu. 2021, Technology for Circular Economy: A Prologue to the 2021 SWITCH-Asia Leadership Academy. NTNUVitenskapelig foredrag

Digitalisering. Samfunnsendring, brukerperspektiv og kritisk tenkning.

Søraa, Roger Andre; Ask, Kristine. 2021, NTNUIntervju
1 - 5 av 12 | Neste | Siste »